Use Text Messaging to Stay Connected with Your Teens

Earlier this year, Samsung Mobile conducted a survey focused on family texting habits. The results of the survey claim that text messaging is improving relationships between parents and teens. Not only that, parents are learning something from their teens as a result of use of text messaging to keep in touch with one another.

As a wired parent, I regularly use text messaging to quickly stay in touch and keep communication lines open with my text messaging guru teens… do you? One of the biggest challenges we face as parents of teens is communicating with them.

We want to be involved in their lives, be good listeners, and help with the many challenges that crop up in the middle and high school years. We want to do all of this while allowing our kids to grow and learn on their own without watching their every move.

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How to Avoid Scholarship Scams

Are you planning to attend college after graduating from your GED school and are you worried that you cannot afford the cost of education? There is no denying that colleges and universities these days are quite expensive.

While there are a lot of credible scholarships out there to help you afford high education, there are a lot of not-so-credible ones as well. This is why you have to be careful in making your options as to what scholarship you would apply for.

Nowadays, people are making every possible way to get that money- the easy way. Unfortunately, when you begin your lookout for a scholarship, you may be required to fill out certain papers that are designed to get some essential information from you.

Unknowingly, people behind the scams are fishing out on you so as to steal your personal information to their benefit. To avoid getting scammed, you have to be well versed in all your options so that you can decide which legitimate program is best for you.

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African Americans and College Scholarships

It is not so long ago that obtaining a top academic education was only a faraway dream for most African Americans. For these students, getting hold of well-paying employment and experiencing some of the greater things in their lives existed only in their wildest imagination.

Over the last decades, all this has changed. Nowadays you can find scholarships available to African Americans not only offered by the federal government, but also via companies and corporations, and through public and private sectors as well.

Numerous philanthropic institutions these days have scholarship grants meant for minority groups, especially African Americans. These great scholarship grants offer many African Americans all through the country the possibility to obtain the education and learning they are worthy of.
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Setting Goals with Kids

One of the best perks of being in education is that we get to start over twice a year–once in August/September when the new school year begins and once in January when the new calendar year begins. That means that kids, too, get to reboot twice a year and start anew!

For some of you, perhaps the first part of the school year was a good one for the kids. And for others, perhaps it was a struggle. Either way, setting goals with kids is an excellent practice and can help build skills for life. i.e.: Setting goals and then making action plans to reach goals.

As a teacher, I always set aside time at the start of the school year and at the start of the calendar year for setting goals with my students. The start of the calendar year is also the perfect opportunity to evaluate progress on the goals that were set at the start of the school year. In January, kids could scrap their goals and set brand new ones or simply adjust the ones that they’d set in August. Now is the perfect opportunity to sit down with your kids to set some goals for the remaining months of the school year.

So how do you go about setting goals with kids?

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Question-Answer Relationships

“I can’t find the answer to this question!” The irritated tone of voice signals a growing frustration from one of our students struggling to complete an assignment. Indeed, from a student viewpoint, finding answers to questions seems to occupy the lion’s share of what education is about.

Understanding how questions work is a critical component of learning. Many students are unaware of the different levels of thinking that questions may elicit.

As a result, they follow a “literal” approach of seeking direct statements from the text to answer questions and feel betrayed or even give up when this strategy does not work. I have seen it many times during the GED classes that I teach online.

Other students pay only cursory attention to their reading, instead relying almost solely on what they already know to get their answers, regardless of what the text might say.

For them, answering questions becomes an exercise in “common sense” rather than a thoughtful consideration of new information encountered in print.

There is a powerful activity for helping students analyze and understand questions. Break Question Answer Relationships (known as QARs) questions into two categories: those which have answers supplied by an author (“in the book” QARs) and those which have answers that need to be developed based on the reader’s ideas and experiences (“in my head” QARs). Continue reading

Sight Words (High Frequency Words)

downloadA relatively small number of words (about 100) make up most of the text children read. Some of these words are irregular or not decodable. Successful readers have a large number of words they can read automatically by sight. These are known as sight words.

Suggested Sight Word Lists

Dolch Sight Words

The Dolch list of 220 basic sight words was developed in the 1930’s, based on three comprehensive lists of words compiled in the previous decade. The Dolch words hold sentences together and include adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs.

They include between 52 and 70 percent of all the words children generally find in assigned reading and are commonly divided into four lists: a Pre Primer list, a Primer list, a First Grade List, and a Second Grade list. Other lists of words have been developed with a high degree of consistency in the first hundred words.

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Arizona Scholarships for Hispanics

images-61The state of Arizona has quite a few universities and colleges that offer outstanding educative programs for people who would like to become educated on a higher level. On the other hand, at the majority of these colleges and universities, the tuition cost can be a problem.

The high cost of further study makes it very problematic for students who really would like a quality education but are not in the position to afford the tuition.

Especially minority students such as Hispanics are affected by these problems. In order to support these students to deal with the costs of tuition, Arizona has made scholarships available for Hispanics. These state-funded scholarship grants enable Hispanics particularly to attain the top quality education of their wishes.

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Parents How to Prepare for the GED Test

images-63The latest version of the GED test was rolled out in January 2014, and is entirely computer-based. The GED test contains four sub-tests on the fields of Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Literacy.

The GED is modular, meaning you can take the four sub-tests (modules) separately within a 2-year time frame. Writing skills are tested through all four subject areas but developing your writing skills is more crucial than ever before.

Writing Skills. To complete the GED test successfully, it is absolutely important that candidates perform well on the writing tasks. They will have to demonstrate their ability to read with understanding, to examine discussions, and to use information from principal texts.

In order to pass the GED exam, applicants must be able to create structured sentences, deal with details and main topics in their answers, and demonstrate competence of the normal rules of English grammar.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

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One book that changed your life and more on books

1. One book that changed your life The Diary of Anne Frank. I found it tucked away in the secretary at my family’s cottage one day and asked my mom if I could read it. She hesitated, knowing the content of the book and that I was only a few years younger than Anne when she started her diary, but ended up letting me.

I sat on the back beach in an Adirondack chair with the book in my lap and fell head-first into her world, a world that I didn’t know ever existed until then. Her story absolutely changed my outlook on life and how I viewed and treated other people.

2. One book you’ve read more than once She’s Come Undone by Wally Lamb. God, I love Dolores. I read it around the time of my mother’s liver transplant and it was the only thing that kept me from going right off the deep end.

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Education into Uneducated Thought

The Presidents of some of the nation’s most prestigious Colleges and universities have signed a petition put out by the Amethyst Initiative, which is sponsored by Citizens for Responsible Drinking Choices, which is run by far-left liberals out of Middlebury College, in Vermont, who, no doubt, would like to see us back to the Greco-Roman days where we can all frolic through the streets naked singing poems back and forth (am I done? I think so, but to remind you of where we started… a petition) that calls for a national debate on lowering the drinking age to 18.

No, the Presidents of some of the nation’s most prestigious Colleges didn’t sign a petition that calls for a national debate on lowering marijuana use, so Mexican drug lords can stop kidnapping, beheading, and assassinating random and sometimes not so random Mexican citizens.

People think it’s all fine and dandy, “smoking pot doesn’t harm anybody,” well sure if your pot just happens to be grown by the Rednecks or adventurous illegal immigrants out back, but whether the pot is grown out back or in Mexico the money still travels to the same murderous drug lords. But the College presidents couldn’t be bothered to sign that petition. Continue reading